Friday, 29 March 2013

A Fictional OER on Digital Skills

Overview

This course is aimed at the older Greek and Greek–Cypriot diasporas in Britain, Australia and Germany who went to these countries in the 1950s and 1960s, either as economic migrants or to escape the civil war in Cyprus or military dictatorship in Greece.

The course is intended to help members of these communities develop digital skills to maintain links with their country of origin.

Brief Proposed Structure of OER

Week
Topic
Resources
Suitability
1
Informational Websites
There is a lot of information of Greece and Cyprus. However, the vast majority of it focuses on Ancient Greece and some of the modern Cypriot material concentrates on the civil war. I could find nothing on the present crises in either country.
B
2
Joining Discussion Groups
There are no materials on how to join and use discussion groups.
B
3
Using Social Media
There are some OERs which look at the educational impact of social media but nothing instructional.
B
4
Language Skills
There are several Greek language courses
M
5
Modern Culture
There are some resources on modern Greek and Cypriot culture and music
M


Reflections

There is an assumption that the users of these repositories are either ‘digital natives’ or have some level of competency when it comes to digital skills. Clearly there is a need for OERs that do not make this assumption. Also it is clear that the OERs found through the repositories reflect the teaching in the universities and other institutions linked to the repositories. Therefore the needs of the students at these institutions are placed at the forefront when OERs are put together. They may be open to all but they are not appropriate to all. 

I would not try and change the OER to fit in with the materials that are available through these respositories simply because this feels to me to be the wrong way around. Perhaps there is space for a repository that looks beyond the digital resources in higher education and towards those created from community education instead.

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